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Design and Technology

What is DT?

 

"Design is a funny word. Some people think design means how it looks. But of course, if you look deeper, it's really how it works."

Steve Jobs

 

"Technology makes possibilities. Design makes solutions."

John Maeda

Design & Technology at High Wycombe Church of England Combined School


At High Wycombe C of E we believe that Design & Technology is a valuable subject in the curriculum as it provides pupils with the opportunity to try out ideas and explore their creative nature whilst, at the same time, gaining an understanding of how and why products are made and how mechanical devices work. Our pupils gain an understanding of the design process of how a designer recognises a need for a product, explores existing products, tries out ideas and learns from successes and failures in order to arrive at a final design. 

Pupils spend lots of time creating models and items in Design and Technology lessons. We use a variety of tools and materials in order to develop skills. 

We look in detail at how we can use mechanisms, food, electronics, textiles and structures. Each class carries out three projects a year in three different areas.

Pupils spend time researching an areas, before designing their own products, making a final piece and finally evaluating it. Design and Technology is a very popular subject with the children as they get to express their creative side and problem solving skills. 

The nature of the subject allows pupils to generate the courage to take sensible risks when exploring ideas. Overcoming difficulties in design helps them develop resilience and successes promote confidence. Evaluating theirs and others work - including the work of well-known designers - gives pupils a sense of respect.

Whether or not a pupils' future lies in design or manufacturing, we believe Design & Technology prepares pupils for a rapidly and ever changing technological world and opens the doors to opportunity.

 

Vision/Aim

 

Broadly speaking, our vision for Design & Technology at High Wycombe C of E Combined School is as follows:

For the pupils to generate interesting and exciting ideas based on research and experience to produce creative work to the best of their ability; to explore ideas using their knowledge, skills and their imagination; to record their experience and to consistently challenge themselves to achieve within the subject.

For pupils to become proficient in the design process - research, exploration, adapting ideas based on success, failure and the opinions of 'the marketplace' and evaluating. For pupils to improve in drawing and making (including food technology) through the mastery of tools and materials, and to explore media to gain greater appreciation of the skills and aesthetics of designers and craftspeople and the works they create.

For pupils to evaluate and analyse creative works (including food items) using the language of Design & Technology.

For pupils to broaden their knowledge of designers, food technicians and craftspeople and to understand historical and cultural development.

For pupils to develop a love of learning for the subject, not only to enjoy the opportunities it gives to explore ideas and the technological workings of products and to use tools and media in a joyful way but to also seize the opportunity to develop skills that may provide them with opportunities in later life.

For pupils, as members of a Christian school, to appreciate the design of objects as a way to enhance the world in which we live and to appreciate design as a gift from God.

For pupils to encompass the learning behaviours and Christian values in all they do in lessons.

Intent


Design and Technology is an inspiring, rigorous and practical subject that prepares children to deal with the rapidly changing world of tomorrow and to understand the innovations that have shaped the world of today. Design and Technology encourages children to learn to think and intervene creatively to solve problems both as individuals and as members of a team.

At High Wycombe Church of England Combined School, we encourage children to use their creativity and imagination, to design and make products that solve real and relevant problems within a variety of contexts, considering their own and others’ needs, wants and values; combining practical skills with an understanding of aesthetics.

We aim to, wherever possible, link work to other disciplines such as Mathematics, Science, PSHE, History, Computing, English Language and Literature and Art.

Pupils are also given opportunities to reflect upon and evaluate past and present design technology, its uses and its effectiveness and are encouraged to become innovators and risk-takers.

It is the intent of High Wycombe Church of England Combined School for Design Technology to be taught in all year groups through at least one topic per term or three topics in an academic year, which includes opportunities relating to food in most year groups.

 

Key objectives of intent within the Design Technology Curriculum based on the National Curriculum 2014 guidance:

  • Products are to be made for a purpose.
  • Individuality should be ensured in children’s design and construction of products.
  • Delivery of the two strands: Designing and Making and Cooking and Nutrition.
  • More emphasis to be given on creating ‘innovative’ products in KS2.
  • Teaching the importance of making on-going changes and improvements during making stages.
  • Looking into seasonality of ingredients and how they are grown, caught or reared.
  • The introduction of computing and coding of products in KS2.
  • Researching key events and individual designers in the History of Technology in KS2.

 

Aims

The national curriculum for Design and Technology aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • develop the creative, technical and practical expertise need to perform everyday tasks confidently and to participate successfully in an increasingly technological world.
  • build and apply a repertoire of knowledge, understanding and skills in order to design and make high-quality prototypes and products for a wide range of users
  • critique, evaluate and test their ideas and products and the work of others
  • understand and apply the principles of nutrition and learn how to cook.

 

Implementation


Through a variety of creative and practical activities, we teach the knowledge, understanding and skills needed to engage in an iterative process of designing and making. Pupils design and create products that consider function and purpose and which are relevant to a range of sectors (for example, the home, school, leisure, culture, enterprise, industry and the wider environment).

 

The teaching of Design and Technology across the school follows the National Curriculum through the provision of selected tasks to provide a range of skills and experiences for pupils. Children design products with a purpose in mind and an intended user of the products. Food technology is implemented across the school with children developing an understanding of where food comes from, the importance of a varied and healthy diet and how to prepare food in a hygienic environment.

Design and Technology is a crucial part of school life and learning and it is for this reason that as a school we are dedicated to the teaching and delivery of a high quality Design and Technology curriculum; through well-planned and resourced projects and experiences.

 

Design and Technology also embeds our school’s Learning Behaviours. It is an inspiring, rigorous and practical subject, requiring creativity, resourcefulness, and imagination. Pupils design and make products that solve real and relevant problems within a variety of contexts.

 

Early Years Foundation Stage

During the EYFS, pupils explore and use a variety of media and materials through a combination of child initiated and adult directed activities. They have the opportunities to learn to:

  • Use different media and materials to express their own ideas
  • Use what they have learnt about media and materials in original ways, thinking about form, function and purpose
  • Make plans and construct with a purpose in mind using a variety of resources
  • Develop skills to use simple tools and techniques appropriately, effectively and safely
  • Select appropriate resources for a product and adapt their work where necessary
  • Cook and prepare food adhering to good health and hygiene routines

 

National Curriculum requirements at Key Stage 1

Through a variety of creative and practical activities, pupils should be taught the knowledge, understanding and skills needed to engage in an iterative process of designing and making. They should work in a range of relevant contexts, (for example the home and school, gardens and playgrounds, the local community, industry and the wider environment).

When designing and making, pupils should be taught to:

 

Design

  • design purposeful, functional, appealing products for themselves and other users based on design criteria
  • generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas through talking, drawing, templates, mock-ups and, where appropriate, information and communication technology
  •  

Make

  • select from and use a range of tools and equipment to perform practical tasks, (or example, cutting, shaping, joining and finishing)
  • select from and use a wide range of materials and components, including construction materials, textiles and ingredients, according to their characteristics
  •  

Evaluate

  • explore and evaluate a range of existing products
  • evaluate their ideas and products against design criteria
  •  

Technical knowledge

  • build structures, exploring how they can be made stronger, stiffer and more stable
  • explore and use mechanisms, (for example levers, sliders, wheels and axles), in their products.

 

National Curriculum requirements for food and Nutrition at KS1

As part of their work with food, pupils should be taught how to cook and apply the principles of nutrition and healthy eating. Instilling a love of cooking in pupils will also open a door to one of the great expressions of human creativity. Learning how to cook is a crucial life skill that enables pupils to feed themselves and others affordably and well, now and in later life.

Pupils should be taught to:

• use the basic principles of a healthy and varied diet to prepare dishes 

• understand where food comes from. 

 

 

 

In Key Stage 2:

Within key stage 2 key events and individuals that have influenced the world of Design Technology are teaching focuses that are to be covered. 
The use of computer programmes and applications are also a key focus to be utilised by children in their design of their products.

 

National Curriculum requirements at Key Stage 2

Through a variety of creative and practical activities, pupils should be taught the knowledge, understanding and skills needed to engage in an iterative process of designing and making. They should work in a range of relevant contexts, for example, the home, school, leisure, culture, enterprise, industry and the wider environment. 

 

When designing and making, pupils should be taught to: 

 

Design 

•   use research and develop design criteria to inform the design of innovative, functional, appealing products that are fit for purpose, aimed at particular individuals or groups 

•   generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas through discussion, annotated sketches, cross-sectional and exploded diagrams, prototypes, pattern pieces and computer-aided design 

 

Make 

•   select from and use a wider range of tools and equipment to perform practical tasks, such as cutting, shaping, joining and finishing, accurately 

•   select from and use a wider range of materials and components, including construction materials, textiles and ingredients, according to their functional properties and aesthetic qualities 

 

Evaluate 

•   investigate and analyse a range of existing products 

•   evaluate their ideas and products against their own design criteria and consider the views of others to improve their work 

•   understand how key events and individuals in design and technology have helped shape the world 

 

Technical knowledge 

•   apply their understanding of how to strengthen, stiffen and reinforce structures that are more complex 

•   understand and use mechanical systems in their products, (for example as gears, pulleys, cams, levers and linkages)

•   understand and use electrical systems in their products, (for example series circuits incorporating switches, bulbs, buzzers and motors) 

•   to apply their understanding of computing to programme, monitor and control their products.

 

 

 

National Curriculum requirements for food and nutrition at KS2 

As part of their work with food, pupils should be taught how to cook and apply the principles of nutrition and healthy eating. Instilling a love of cooking in pupils will also open a door to one of the great expressions of human creativity. Learning how to cook is a crucial life skill that enables pupils to feed themselves and others affordably and well, now and in later life. 

Pupils should be taught to: 

• understand and apply the principles of a healthy and varied diet 

• prepare and cook a variety of predominantly savoury dishes using a range of cooking techniques 

• to understand seasonality, and know where and how a variety of ingredients are grown, reared, caught and processed. 

Design:
• use research and develop design criteria to inform the design of innovative, functional, appealing products that are fit for purpose, aimed at particular individuals or groups.
• generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas through discussion, annotated sketches, cross-sectional diagrams, prototypes, pattern pieces and computer-aided design.

Make:
• select from and use a wider range of tools and equipment to perform practical tasks (for example, cutting, shaping, joining and finishing, as well as chopping and slicing) accurately.
• select from and use a wider range of materials, ingredients and components, including construction materials, textiles and ingredients, according to their functional properties, aesthetic qualities and, where appropriate, taste.

Evaluate:
• investigate and analyse a range of existing products.
• evaluate their ideas and products against their own design criteria and consider the views of others to improve their work.
• understand how key events and individuals in design and technology have helped shape the world.

Technical knowledge:
• apply their understanding of how to strengthen, stiffen and reinforce structures that are more complex.
• understand and use mechanical systems in their products.
• understand and use electrical systems in their products.
• apply their understanding of computing to program, monitor and control their products
• Understand some of the ways that food can be processed and the effect of different cooking practices (including baking and grilling).

Key skills and key knowledge for Design and Technology have been mapped across the school to ensure progression between year groups. The context for the children’s work in Design and Technology is also well considered and pupils learn about real life structures and the purpose of specific examples, as well as developing their skills throughout the programme of study.

 

Impact


We ensure pupils:
• develop the creative, technical and practical expertise needed to perform everyday tasks confidently and to participate successfully in an increasingly technological world
• build and apply a repertoire of knowledge, understanding and skills in order to design and make prototypes and products for a wide range of users and critique, evaluate and test their ideas and products and the work of others
• understand and apply the principles of nutrition and learn how to prepare and cook food.

 

Children will design and make a range of products. A good quality finish appropriate to each pupil’s age and relative ability will be expected in all design activities.

Children learn how to take risks, becoming resourceful, innovative, enterprising and capable citizens. Through the evaluation of past and present design and technology, they develop a critical understanding of its impact on daily life and the wider world. They will grow to appreciate that high-quality design and technology education makes an essential contribution to the creativity, culture, wealth and well-being of the nation.

Above all, we aim to ensure that pupils develop a rich learning experience and an enjoyment for the subject of Design & Technology.

 

Assessment of children's learning in Design Technology is an ongoing monitoring of children's understanding, knowledge and skills by the class teacher, throughout lessons. This assessment is then used to inform differentiation, support and challenge required by the children.
Class teachers conduct summative assessment termly across each year group of the school to inform the subject leader of progress or skills and knowledge still to be embedded.
Design Technology is also monitored by the subject leader through a cyclical process in accordance with the school’s improvement planning in the form of monitoring of planning, lesson observations, looking at outcomes and pupil interviews to discuss their learning and understanding and establish the impact of the teaching taking place.

EYFS pupils' progress and attainment is tracked using the Early Excellence Assessment tracker system, telling us whether each individual child is below expected, at expected or above expected attainment for their age.

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